NACA Board Meeting

NACA Board Meeting

Thursday, September 09, 2021 8:00 AM – 9:00 AM PDT

Membership is invited to join the monthly NACA Board Meeting

Every 2nd Thursday public meeting

Board Application Process is Closed

Board Application Process is Closed

The Board Member Application Process opened on July 12th, 2021 at 10:00 AM CST and closed August 13th, 2021 at 10:00AM Central

July 12th – August 13th– Applications/nominations for new board members open
August 13th – August 20th – Committee will review the applications
August 20th – October 15th – Candidate Bios will be available on the website for review by the membership
October 19th – 20th – VOTING by membership
Oct 23rd – Annual Membership Meeting with new board members announced
Oct 23rd – First Board Meeting with new board members (immediately following the membership meeting)

NACA Board Application Process Opens 7/12/2021

NACA Board Application Process Opens 7/12/2021 at 10AM Central

Application Process Closes On August 13, 2021

BE A NATIONAL LEADER

Serving on the NACA Board is one of the most rewarding ways for you as a Animal Care and Control Professional to bring your expertise to the service of animal care and control at the national level.

Applications to the Board of Directors must be made via the NACA Website Board Election Page

To complete the Board Member Application, the applicant must be an Individual NACA Member in good standing.

The 100-word Statement of Willingness to Serve must be submitted with the Board Application.

The application acceptance process will begin on July 12, 2021 and end on August 13, 2021 at 10:00AM Central

Click Here for Details and to access the Board Member Application.

Welcome New Director of Partnerships & Programs – Jerrica Owen

Director of Partnerships & Programs, Jerrica Owen

NACA is proud to introduce the newest member of our team; Director of Partnerships and Programs, Jerrica Owen. Check out a little bit about our newest team member below:
 
Accomplished animal welfare professional Jerrica Owen joined NACA on April 12th, 2021, as the Director of Partnerships and Programs. She brings with her nearly 20 years of experience in emergent animal welfare, engaging and developing a diversity of staff, shelter operations, and leading successful initiatives in Animal Welfare in a cross-cultural environment. Previously the Director of Strategic Initiatives for San Diego Humane Society, Jerrica supported achieving success on the organization’s primary strategies. In addition, she was the Senior Animal Response Team Leader for the San Diego Humane Society’s Emergency Response Team and has extensive experience in the field during some of our countries worst disasters supporting tactical and shelter operations for all types of animals including domestic, wildlife, and equine.
 
Jerrica has spent the past 2 decades dedicated to achieving lifesaving excellence and encompasses dynamic organizational leadership, charismatic characteristics, and an energetic passion that will complement the already remarkable work of the NACA. She will support driving the continued success of NACA as the national leader in professionalism and standard-setting of the animal control and service profession. She is committed to inclusive engagement and resource accessibility for the industry.
 
Jerrica earned her Bachelors of Science Degree from California State University-Chico and holds certifications in Animal Welfare Administration (CAWA), Lean Six Sigma Green Belt, Organizational Leadership, and Modern Humane Resource Management. She lives in California and is a proud wife and mother to both human, fur, and shelled (Tortoise!) babies.
 
We are so thrilled to have Jerrica join the team, dedicated to helping advance animal control officers and the great work they are doing all across the country!

 

NACA First Responders Position Statement

Animal Control Officers Should Be Considered First Responders

The National Animal Care & Control Association (NACA) believes all animal field services professionals (animal control, animal protection, etc.), should be considered and treated as first responders. The Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management Systems define first responders as “individuals who in the early stages of an incident are responsible for the protection and preservation of life, property, evidence, and the environment”. Animal control officers and other animal field services professionals meet this definition.

The very core of the work of an animal control officer is deeply rooted in community engagement, public safety and the welfare of non-human animals. Historically, animal control officers were on the frontline of protecting communities and addressing public health concerns such as preventing the spread of the rabies virus. Their early role has now been dramatically expanded to include providing community support and outreach, investigating animal cruelty and neglect, and saving animals who are in immediate danger. Additionally, they work alongside other first responders such as law enforcement, EMTs, and firefighters on a regular basis during weather emergencies, natural disasters, and other catastrophic events.

Communities and local municipal agencies should view and support their animal control officers at the same level as other first responders. Additionally, communities and local government agencies should provide on-going training, equipment, and resources necessary to support the work of their animal control officers working at the frontline of their community.

Homeland Security Act of 2002. (2019, May 28). Retrieved December 06, 2020, from https://www.dhs.gov/homeland-security-act-200​

Download: NACA First Responders Position Statement (pdf)